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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Where does sustainability fit into your investment strategy?

By Amy Erixon and Rodney McDonald (Toronto)

As weather patterns become increasingly difficult to predict, and extreme weather events begin to wreak greater havoc on buildings across the globe, the time has come for all real estate investors – not just a few developers or institutions – to incorporate sustainability into their investment decision-making process.

If you’re still wondering if such a shift in thinking is worth it, consider these facts:

More clients and tenants looking for sustainable real estate
If you operate a real estate investment management company, you likely field questions regularly about sustainability options. This situation arises because many investment funds – such as the Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan – today have their own investment sustainability criteria that guide their investment decision-making process across diverse assets, including real estate, stocks and bonds.

Similarly, many tenants are increasingly attracted to green buildings. In a recent PGIM survey, 78% of tenants said that energy efficiency and green building operations are either important or very important to them.

Sustainability has positive impact on returns
Yes, more sustainable buildings are good for the environment – but they’re good for investors’ bottom lines, too. A 2016 study by Drs. Nils Kok and Avis Devine, published in the September 2016 issue of the Journal of Portfolio Management, looked at 10 years of financial performance data for landlord Bentall Kennedy’s North American office portfolio. The study showed that by reducing energy consumption by 14%, the company was able to increase renewal rates (5.6%), tenant satisfaction (7%), rent (3.7%) and occupancy (4%) – and decrease concessions 4% as well.

In today’s era of rapid social, economic, global and geopolitical change, it’s essential to do your due diligence when acquiring and managing an asset. While many investors and investment management companies use data to guide their decision-making process, they often continue to overlook climate data. Such an omission could be costly down the road. Using climate maps as data points today can help you protect your long-term returns – for example, by helping you to identify areas prone to flooding and take proactive measures to mitigate the financial impacts of severe flooding on your real asset portfolio.

Such foresight will not only help protect your building(s) from environmental damage in the future, but also allow you to avoid higher insurance premiums.


(Amy Erixon is a Principal of Avison Young and Managing Director, Investments. Rodney McDonald is a Principal of Avison Young and leads the firm’s consulting and project management services in Ontario. He also leads Avison Young’s Global Citizenship affinity group, implementing the firm’s corporate social responsibility, sustainability and philanthropy strategy. Both Erixon and McDonald are based in Toronto and can be reached at (416) 955-0000.)

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